Andrew Johnson’s Proclamations

At this time, this is my last post on money as the reason Lincoln wanted to “preserve the Union.” The reason being I want to address the issue of Negro Confederates one more time. I may come back to this topic later as I find new information.

As the war progressed from the time of Fort Sumter to surrender it was a goal of the Union authorities to collect revenue from the South. That fact is evident in the ORs by simply researching and noting all the taxes and duties imposed on the people of the South by the US Army, it is also a fact that the US Congress passed taxes on the South AFTER the firing at Fort Sumter. It is also evident that many millions of dollars of goods were plundered from the people of the South. Exactly how much I can’t say, I am not investing the time and effort to try and figure out a round figure.

On a slightly different note I did find a letter stating how much the Confederate paid the United States for clothing the Confederate POWs. Something else to squeeze a penny out of the South.

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War of the Rebellion: Serial 121 Page 0313 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION AND CONFEDERATE.

75 MURRAY STREET, New York, February 27, 1865.

Statement of 828 bales of cotton received January 28, 1865, per steamer Atlanta. Sold, February 8, 1865, by Burdett

Page 314

The sale was made at the auction rooms corner of Wall and Front streets.

Gross amount of sales ……………………………$348,622.34

Gross amount of expenses…………………………. 16,832.68

————

Net proceeds……………………………………. 331,789.66

At the dispoal of Brigadier General W. N. R. Beall, Provisional Army, C. S., to purchase clothing to be distributed to prisoners of war held by the United States.

I would state that of the $16,832.68 are held under order of the agent of internal revenue to be paid over to the United States Government, the tax being 2 cents per pound on the cotton. As the cotton was received by the United States in a Southern port, transported by a U. S. vessel, and under charge of a U. S. officer, to me at this place in accordance with the late arrangement between General Grant and Colonel Ould, and no import duty having been charged upon supplies sent South, I respectfully ask that the said cotton be not taxed the usual internal revenue tax of 2 cents per pound, and that an order be issued to the agent of internal revenue to this effect. I would further state that the transport Atlanta, which received the 1,000 bales of cotton in Mobile Bay, proved insufficient in capacity to transport it, and the U. S. officer, Captain Frank G. Noyes, on January 16 reshipped on another vessel 170 bales of the cotton, and that nothing has been heard from this cotton to the present time.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. N. R. BEALL,

Brigadier-General, Provisional Army, C. S.,

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The South was devastated and robbed blind by the Yankee invaders, the U. S. government was still not satisfied with their finical gains. One of the first tings Johnson did was set up a system for the collection of revenue in the South. This just serves to prove that revenue before, during and after the war was one of the highest priorities of “preserving the Union!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

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War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0013 UNION AUTHORITIES.

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

Washington City, May 9, 1865.

Ordered:

1. That all acts and proceedings of the political, military, and civil organizations which have been in a state of insurrection and rebellion

Page 14

3. That the Secretary of the Treasury proceed without delay to nominate for appointment assessors of taxes and collectors of customs and internal revenue, and such other officers of the Treasury Department as are authorized by law, and shall put in execution the revenue laws of the United States within the geographical limits aforesaid.

Page 15

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set any hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L. S.] ANDREW JOHNSON.

By the President:

W. HUNTER,

Acting Secretary of State.

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War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0037 UNION AUTHORITIES.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, the fourth section of the fourth article of the Constitution of the United States declares that the United States shall guarantee

Page 38

And I do hereby direct–

Page 39

Third. That the Secretary of the Treasury proceed to nominate for appointment assessors of taxes, and collectors of customs and internal revenue, and such other officers of the Treasury Department as are authorized by law, and put in execution the revenue laws of the United States within the geographical limits aforesaid.

L. S.] ANDREW JOHNSON.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State.

(Same, mutatis mutandis, issued for the State of Mississippi, June 13, 1865; for the States of Georgia and Texas (separate proclamations) June 17, 1865; for the State of Alabama, June 21, 1865; for the State of South Carolina, June 30, 1865, and for the State of Florida, July 13, 1865.

William L. Sharkey was appointed Provisional Governor of Mississippi, James Johnson for Georgia, Andrew J. Hamilton for Texas, Lewis E. Parsons for Alabama, Benjamin F. Perry for South Carolina, and William Marvin for Florida.)

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