Caught in a Lie

Caught in a Lie

War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0245 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 6, 1861.

Captain THEO. TALBOT, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: You will proceed directly to Charleston, S. C., and if on your arrival there the flag of the United States shall be flying over Fort Sumter, and the fort shall not have been attacked, you will procure an interview with Governor Pickens, and read to him as follows:

I am directed by the President of the United States to notify [you] to expect an attempt will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions only, and that if such attempt be not resisted, no effort to throw in provisions, arms, or ammunition will be made without further notice or in case of an attack upon the fort.

After you shall have read this to Governor Pickens, deliver to him the copy of it herein inclosed, and retain this letter yourself.

But if on your arrival at Charleston you shall ascertain that Fort Sumter shall have ben already evacuated or surrendered by the United States force, you will seek no interview with Governor Pickens, but return here forthwith.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

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(Received A. G. O., April 9.)

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. A.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that everything is quiet around us. The schooner (she is a revenue cutter) reported as lying near our work still remains there. One of her officers boarded our mail-boat yesterday, and said that his orders were not to permit any boat to pass from Fort Sumter to the shore without bearing a white flag. I do not believe that General Beauregard has either placed her where she is or given her those orders, and I have written to him to-day in reference to it.

A mortar battery near Mount Pleasant is firing shells this morning. I have also called the general’s attention to that firing, as some of the shells have burst nearer to us than is safe. The truth is that the sooner we are out of this harbor the better. Our flag runs an hourly risk of being insulted, and my hands are tied by my orders, and if that was not the case, I have not the power to protect it. God grant that neither I nor any other officer of our Army may be again placed in a position of such mortification and humiliation.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, New York, April 6, 1861.

Lieutenant CHARLES R. WOODS,

Ninth Infantry, Act. Supt. East. Dept., R. S., Fort Columbus, N. Y.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief desires that two hundred recruits from Fort Columbus be at once organized into two companies, and held in readiness for embarkation on Monday next, the 8th instant

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A proper proportion of non-commissioned officers will be included in the detachment, which must be fully supplied with arms, ammunition, and subsistence.

First Lieutenant Edward McK. Hudson, Fourth Artillery, First Lieutenant R. O. Tyler, Third Artillery, and Second Lieutenant C. W. Thomas, First Infantry, are assigned to duty with the recruits.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. L. SCOTT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and A. D. C., Act. Adjt. General
**************************************************

War of the Rebellion: Serial 001 Page 0248 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE PROVISIONAL ARMY, C. S., Charleston, S. C., April 7, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C.:

SIR: In compliance with orders from the Confederate Government at Montgomery, I have the honor to inform you that, in consequence of the delays and apparent vacillations of the United States Government at Washington relative to the evacuation of Fort Sumter, no further communications for the purposes of supply with this city from the fort and with the fort from this city will be permitted from and after this day. The mails, however, will continue to be transmitted as heretofore, until further instructions from the Confederate Government.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.
********************************************

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, New York, April 8, 1861.

First Lieutenant EDWARD McK. HUDSON,

Fourth Artillery, Commanding U. S. troops on the steamer Baltic:

SIR: I am instructed by the General-in-Chief to say to you that the destination of the two hundred recruits embarked on the steamer Baltic is Fort Sumter, and that “Captain G. V. Fox, ex-officer of the Navy, and a gentleman-of high standing, as well as possessed of extraordinary nautical ability, has been charged by high authority in Washington with the command of the expedition, under cover of certain ships of war.”

You will accordingly be governed by the instructions of Captain Fox.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. L. SCOTT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and A. D. C., Act. Adjt. General
**********************************************

HDQRS. PROV. FORCES CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: Your favor of this day has just been received, through Captain James.* The private letters you refer to in the mail of yesterday were

—————

*See Anderson to Thomas, April 10, 1861, p. 249; and for copies of Anderson’s and Foster’s dispatches of April 8, seized by the Confederate authorities, see Pickens to Walker, April 9, 1861, pp. 292-294.

—————

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sent to their destination, but the public ones were sent to the Confederate Government at Montgomery, in return for the treachery of Mr. Fox, who has been reported to have violated his word given to Governor Pickens before visiting Fort Sumter.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.
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Page 250

.]

HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY C. S., Charleston, S. C., April 8, 1861-8 p. m.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

Commanding at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that from and after this day no mails will be allowed to go to or come from Fort Sumter until further instructions from the Confederate Government at Montgomery.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

************************************

FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 9, 1861-2.15 p. m.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge to have this moment received your favor of 8 p. m. April 8, notifying me that from and after that date no mails would be allowed to go to our come from Fort Sumter, and respectfully request that you would be pleased to have the mail or mails which were forwarded prior to the receipt of your notification returned to this post.

Confidently hoping that you will comply with the request,

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.
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Numbers 100.] FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 11, 1861.

(Received A. G. O., April 26.)

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: Although not permitted to send off my daily report, I shall continue, as long as I can, to prepare them, so that if an opportunity is afforded me I shall have them ready. I have the honor to report that everything around us shows that these people are expecting the arrival of a hostile force, and they are making most judicious arrangements to prevent the landing of any supplies at this fort. Yesterday and this morning the garrisons of the works around us were re-enforced. Last night rockets were thrown up from Charleston and Mount Pleasant, about 12 o’clock, and a row-boat, bearing a red light, came down from Charleston and communicated with the guard-boats, consisting, as far as we could observe, of seven steamers and four schooners, and returned to the city about four this morning.

We see the iron floating battery this morning at the west and of Sullivan’s Island, admirably placed for pouring a murderous fire upon any vessel attempting to lay alongside our left flank, and also well situated for enfilading the flanks of this work. With all our watchfulness-and I think no garrison was ever blessed with a more vigilant set of men-none observed the bringing down of that raft. They have also commenced another battery, say about eighty yards from the west end of Sullivan’s Island.

They appear to be determined to get as powerful a fire as possible on the point designated as the one where provisions are intended to be landed, and, had they been in possession of the information contained in your letter of the 4th instant, they could not have made better arrange-

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ments than those they have made, and are making, to thwart the contemplated scheme.

The least dangerous course would be for the officer in charge of the supply vessel, after passing Cummings Point, to run to our wharf and round to, alongside the west face of it. He would thus avoid, whilst unloading, the fire from Fort Moultrie, the batteries at the west end of Sullivan’s Island, and of the iron floating battery, only being exposed to the fire of the batteries in this end of Cummings Point and of Fort Johnson, and at low tide the vessels would be protected by the wharf from the fire from Cummings Point. It would be hot work unloading her, but not so bad as at the other place. We nearly finished last night a traverse, designed to protect our right flank barbette guns from the enfilading fire of the guns on the west end of Sullivan’s Island, and we shall, God willing, strengthen that one, and complete the traverse to the left of the main entrance. The officers and men, thank God, are in pretty good health; and, although feeling aware of the danger of their position, have greater anxiety about the fate of those whom they expect to come to their succor than they entertain for themselves.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding
****************************************

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 12, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your instructions, dated April 6, 1861, I left Washington on the evening of the same day in company with Mr. R. S. Chew, and arrived at Charleston, S. C., on the evening of the 8th instant. Immediately after my arrival I visited Governor Pickens, and, having informed him of the nature of my written instructions, stated that Mr. Chew had requested me to ask his excellency for an interview at his earliest convenience. The governor replied that he would receive Mr. Chew at once, and shortly after I accompanied Mr. Chew to the governor’s quarters. Mr. Chew read to the governor, in my presence, a message from the President of the United States, handing him a copy of the same, which was compared by the governor. The governor stated to Mr. Chew that, South Carolina having ratified the constitution of the Confederate States, General Beauregard now had charge of military affairs in the vicinity of Charleston, and that, as General Beauregard was near at hand, he would desire to have him present at the interview. To this Mr. Chew assented, and General Beauregard having been called into the room, the governor read and handed to him the copy of the message which he had just received.

In compliance with your verbal instructions, I asked Governor Pickens if I would be permitted to proceed to Fort Sumter for the purpose of remaining on duty at that post. The governor referred me to General Beauregard for an answer, by whom the request was peremptorily refused. I then asked if I would be permitted to hold communication with Major Anderson at Fort Sumter, with the distinct understanding that after such interview I should immediately return to Charleston. This was also refused, General Beauregard remarking that no communication whatever would be permitted with Major Anderson, except to convey an order for the evacuation of the fort, such being the instructions received from Montgomery.

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then informed Governor Pickens and General Beauregard that I had no further official business to transact with them, and that it was the desire of Mr. Chew and myself and myself to start North that night. Both replied that there would be no obstruction to our departure, and each of them detailed an officer of the staff to escort us to the railroad depot. We left Charleston at 11 o’clock p. m. on the 8th instant, arriving here this morning. We were detained several hours at Florence, S. C., and at Richmond, Va., in consequence of the railway trains failing to connect at those places. I brought back with me the sealed dispatch for Major Anderson, instructed to my care by the President.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THEO. TALBOT,

Brevet Captain, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army.
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We see how the Federal government, Lincolns administration, out and out lied about re-enforcing Fort Sumter. Major Anderson knew of the make up of the force headed his way. It is only reasonable to think the Confederates knew as much since Anderson pointed this out in a letter. What is amazing, knowing they had been caught in a lie the Federal government proceeds with their plans to send troops and arms to Fort Sumter thereby starting the war. Has anyone noticed slavery is still not mentioned????.

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2 thoughts on “Caught in a Lie

  1. Rob,

    You didn’t apologize so you comments will not be posted.

    You are wrong, these letters are in plain English, they show the true events as they happened. We really do not care that you disagree or the fact you haven’t the ability to understand what is posted.

  2. I don’t have to point anything out to you. If you want to know why YOU look it up. This is my blog and I have the final word. It is that simple.

    No what I have posted is in content. This is the yankee version of what happened. These letters point out that Lincoln was sending an armed fleet despite his assurances that he was not. The Confederates were preparing for an armed invasion. Washington was warned by Anderson.

    You should take advantage of my research and learn some real history, instead of holding on to an agenda that is constantly being proven wrong. If you continue to refuse to admit you didn’t know these facts and refuse to admit you are wrong I will just trash you posts right off the bat.

    I AM NOT ARGUING WITH AN IDIOTS AGENDA.

    You have been warned.

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