After The Star of the West, From the ORs, part 2

OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 151 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF WAR, Charleston, January 21, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON:

SIR: In offering to permit you to purchase in this city, through the instrumentality of an officer of the State, such fresh supplies of provisions as you might need, his excellency the governor was influenced solely by considerations of courtesy; and if he had no other motive for refusing to any of your garrison free access to the city to procure such supplies, he would have been moved by prudential reasons for the safety of your people, in preventing a collision between them and our own citizens. As to the manner of procuring your supplies, his excellency is indifferent whether it is done by the officer referred to, or whether your market supplies are delivered to you at Fort Johnson by the butcher whom you say you have before employed. It is only insisted on that the supplies, if sent, shall be carried over in a boat under an officer of the State who takes to Fort Johnson your daily mails. His excellency desires me to say that he willingly accedes to your request as to the women and children in Fort Sumter, and that he will afford every facility in his power to enable you to remove them from the fort at any time and in any manner that will be most agreeable to them.

I am, sir, respectfully, yours,

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Page 152

FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 22, 1861.

Hon. D. F. JAMISON,,

Executive Office, Department of War, Charleston:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 21st instant, and to express my gratification at its tenor. I shall direct my staff officer to write to the contractor in reference to his supplying us with beef, and will communicate with you as soon as the necessary preliminaries are arranged, in order that you may then, if you please, give the requisite instructions for carrying them into effect. Be pleased to express to his excellency the governor my thanks for the kind and prompt manner in which he gave his consent to the proposed transfer of the women and children of this garrison. As there are on Sullivan’s Island the families of two of our non-commissioned officers, with their furniture, &c., and also a quantity of private property [including some musical instruments-not public property] belonging to this command, which the first commander of Fort Moultrie, Colonel De Saussure, sent me word he had collected and placed under lock and key, it will be necessary to permit the two non-commissioned officers to go to the island to assist in moving their families, &c. The lighter, it occurs to me, which will be needed to take the families to the steamer, had better go to the island for the property there before coming for the women and children here. As we are all very desirous of guarding against causing any unnecessary excitement, it will afford me great pleasure to have everything done in the most quiet way possible. I shall, consequently, cheerfully govern myself, as far as possible, by the views and wishes of his excellency in reference to this matter, and will be pleased to hear from you what they are. It is my wish, if the weather prove favorable, to ship the families in the Saturday steamer, or the first one after that day.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, January 24, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

First Artillery, Commanding Fort Sumter, Charleston, S. C.:

MAJOR: Your letter [No. 19] of the 21st instant, with inclosures, has been received. The Secretary will reply to it in a few days. Meantime the Secretary desires you to inform him what is the nature of the postal arrangements with your post, and whether they are satisfactory to you. Can you send messengers to Charleston for your mails, and is there danger of your men deserting if they are thus employed?

It is observed that you seal your letters with wax-a good precaution, without which there is no certainty that they have not been opened by unauthorized hands.

Please state whether the men sent up to attend a murder trial in Charleston made an attempt to desert, as reported in the papers.

I am, &c.,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General.

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 24, 1861.

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The storm continued until about daylight this morning. It is still cloudy, but the wind has abated sufficiently to enable our boat to take our mail over to Fort Johnson. I have written to our beef contractor in reference to furnishing us with beef, and also such vegetables as the doctor may deem suitable. The purchase of the latter will, I hope, under existing circumstances, be allowed. A letter has also been written to the agent of the New York line of steamboats about transporting our women and children to New York, where, I hope, the quartermaster will see that they are made comfortable. They will probably leave early next week.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 25, 1861.

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: There is nothing worthy of mention, as far as I know, this morning, except the fact of the New York steamer Columbia having grounded in attempting to go out. She is in the Maffitt’s Channel, nearly in front of the Moultrie House; and as she went on when the tide was well up, there is a chance of her remaining where she is for some time. If the authorities here are in earnest about being willing to grant me marketing facilities, it seems to me they will not object to the Government sending us provisions, groceries, and coal from New York. We can get along pretty well with what we have, but some additions to our supplies would add greatly to our comfort. By burning the old buildings, and, if very hard pushed, the spare gun carriages, &c., we can keep up our necessary fires for three months.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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Page 153

FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 27, 1861. [Received A. G. O., January 30.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to state, in reply to your letter of the 24th instant, that our letters, &c., are sent by boat, daily, at 12 m., to Fort Johnson in a sealed package, addressed to the postmaster in Charleston, and that the return boat brings our mail in a package bearing the post-office seal. I am satisfied with the existing arrangement. The governor told Lieutenant Talbot, when he saw him on his return from Washington, that I might, if I chose, send up to the city for my mails, but that he thought it would not be judicious for me to do so. I do not apprehend that there would be the slightest danger of any of my men deserting if thus employed, but think they might be insulted or maltreated. The report to which your refer, about the attempt of the men who were sent to the city to attend a murder trial to desert, is absolutely and entirely false. Lieutenant Davis [who refused to take them, though offered arms by several persons and urged to accept them] says that the

page 154

men conducted themselves with the greatest propriety, and that, although handsomely entertained, they returned perfectly sober. I have not deemed it advisable to notice in any way the false reports which have originated in Charleston and elsewhere about us. I send herewith a slip containing two such reports. Lieutenant Meade states, and I have no doubt with entire truthfulness, that he made no statement whilst absent to any person about my preferences or my opinions, either military or political, and that the inferences given in the article in the Petersburg paper were not deducible from any facts stated by him. The other article, in the Baltimore paper, stating that a boat containing three of my men was fired into from Sullivan’s Island, is also entirely untrue. I cannot see the object to be attained by the circulation of such untruths. The object of one, which has been repeated more than once, that we are getting fresh provisions from the Charleston market, is apparent enough, viz, to show they are treating us courteously. But even that is not a fact. I send herewith a copy of a letter written to our former beef contractor about furnishing us with meat, &c., to which no reply has yet been received-why, I am unable to ascertain; so that, up to this moment, we have not derived the least advantage from the to this moment, we have not derived the least advantage from the Charleston markets; and I can confidently say that none of my command desire to receive anything from the city for which we are not to pay. Under the daily expectation of the return of Lieutenant Hall, I have deferred sending in a memorandum of the commissary stores on hand. There are now here 38 barrels pork, 37 barrels flour, 13 barrels hard bread, 2 barrels beans, 1 barrel coffee, 1/2 barrel sugar, 3 barrels vinegar, 10 pounds candles, 40 pounds soap, and 3/4 barrel salt. You will see from this that for my present command [especially after the departure of our women and children] we shall have an ample supply of pork and bread. It is a pity that my instructions had not been complied with, which would have given us the small stores which are now deficient, and which we shall not object to receiving as soon as the safety of our country will admit of our getting them. Nothing of importance to report. The Columbia is still aground in the Maffitt’s Channel.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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FORT SUMTER, January 24, 1861.

Mr. DANIEL McSWEENEY:

SIR: I am directed by Major Anderson, commanding this post, to ascertain whether you will furnish such fresh beef and vegetables as may be required here; the beef upon the terms of the contract under which you supplied Fort Moultrie; the vegetables to be purchased by you for us at fair market prices; the whole to be delivered as hitherto, four times in ten days, at some wharf in Charleston, for transportation to Fort Johnson, where it will be received by this garrison. This arrangement, which has been approved by the governor of South Carolina, it is desired shall go into effect immediately, and if you consent to it, you can send 184 pounds of fresh beef at a time, at such hour and wherever Quartermaster-General Hatch [120 Meeting street] may advise you. Of the vegetables you will be further directed. Please acknowledge the receipt of this as soon as possible, in order, if necessary, that other arrangements may be made.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. SEYMOUR,

Captain, U. S. Army.

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page 159

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Mr. Yeadon, from the committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two houses on that clause of the appropriation bill which appropriates $30,000 for dredging Maffitt’s Channel, submitted a report recommending the adoption of the following: “For deepening or otherwise improving Maffitt’s Channel, $30,000, to be drawn by and expended under the direction of a commission, as follows: Messrs. George A. Trenholm, Henry Gourdin, George N. Reynolds, W. G. De Saussure, F. I. Poroher, Hugh E. Vincent, and the mayor of Charleston ex officio: Provided, The work shall not be resumed until Fort Sumter passes into the possession of the authorities of the State, and all the troops of the United States shall be removed from the harbor of Charleston.”

The report was agreed to.

Mr. Buist offered the following resolution:

“Resolved, That it is the opinion of the general assembly that no sessions of the courts of law or equity in this State should be holden so long as the Government at Washington has control of the fortress known as Fort Sumter.”

Ten members objecting, the resolution was ordered for consideration on Monday.

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 30, 1861. [Received A. G. O.,

February 4.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: They are still busily engaged at work on Cummings Point. I am not yet certain what they are going to put there. There was very great activity and stir in the harbor last night. The lookout ship outside the bar displayed a light about half past 11, which was answered by rockets by the guard-boats, of which we noticed four on duty, and soon after two guns were fired from the battery on Morris Island, and at half past 1 o’clock this morning two guns were fired from Fort Moultrie. We could not see any vessels in the offing, but they might have been visible to those on the guard-boats [steamers]. I do hope that no attempt will be made by our friends to throw supplies in; their doing so would do more harm than good. The steamboat company did not send down for our women and children yesterday as they promised; why, I do not know. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 31, 1861. [Received A. G. O.,

February 4.]

Colonel S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The South Carolinians are still busily engaged at work at two places on Cummings Point. They are using heavy timbers, which they square and frame. Last night they worked at least half the night. The agent of the New York steamers informed us yesterday that he could not get a lighter to come down for the women and children, but that he will send one for them to-morrow, so as to take them in the Saturday steamer. No reply, as yet, from the Charleston butcher, our beef contractor. I presume that he dare not send us any provisions,

page 160

for fear that he will be regarded as a traitor to South Carolina for furnishing comfort and aid to her enemies.

God save our country.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

( Note that South Carolina has made every effort to comply with major Anderson’s requests.)

Advertisements

After The Star of the West, From the ORs, part 1

Some emphasis added . Very little commentary. The facts tell the story.

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After The Star of The West

We have now read the events leading up to the Star of the West of the West Incident. Afrer this incident both sides were engaged mostly in building fortifications and strengthening their positions. I will began to post events, from the ORs, leading up to the actual firing on Fort Sumter. There is related information found in the SHAPE website ( http://southernheritageadvancementpreservationeducation.com/page.php?4 ) that can be found by using our serch feature. I have no intention of linking to these other posts at this time.

Some entries iin the ORs will not appear since they contain only daily reports and no real facts. Some entries my be edited for length. If you feel that I have omitted an entry that should be posted please let me know.There may be some spelling errors due to copy and paste. My apologies.

George
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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 136 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 9, 1861.

General TOTTEN;

MY DEAR SIR: I have only a moment to write by Lieutenant Meade [?], who comes with dispatches from Major Anderson. I wish to assure you, however, that the officers of your corps are doing everything in their power to make this work impregnable, even with the present small garrison of seventy men. We even mount all the guns, as we can do it much more rapidly than the garrison. We have twenty-nine guns on the first tier and eleven on the barbette tier. Four 8-inch columbiads are ready to mount to-morrow. I shall place the 10-inch on the parade as mortars.

The firing upon the Star of the West this morning by the batteries on Morris Island opened the war, but Major Anderson hopes that the delay of sending to Washington may possibly prevent civil war. The hope, although a small one, may be the thread that prevents the sundering of the Union. We are none the less determined to defend ourselves to the last extremity. I am in want of funds,and would respectfully urge that as soon as possible $15,000 may be placed to my credit in New York. In haste.

Very respectfully,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.

P. S. – I beg to refer you to Lieutenant Meade [?] for particulars.

J. G. F.

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[Memorandum.]

Received January 12 by Lieutenant Talbot, U. S. Army.

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 10, 1861

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

First Artillery, Commanding at Fort Sumter, S. C.:

SIR: Your dispatches to Numbers 16, inclusive have been received. Before the receipt of that of 31st December,* announcing that the Government

Page 137

might re-enforce you at its leisure, and that you regarded yourself safe in your present position, some two hundred and fifty instructed recruits had been ordered to proceed from Governor’s Island to Fort Sumter on the Star of the West, for the purpose of strengthening the force under your command. The probability is, from the current rumors of to-day, that this vessel has been fired into by the South Carolinians, and has not been able to reach you. To meet all contingencies, the Brooklyn has been dispatched, with instructions not to cross the bar at the harbor of Charleston, but to afford to the Star of the West and those on board all the assistance they may need, and in the event the recruits have not effected a landing at Fort Sumter they will return to Fort Monroe.

I avail myself of the occasion to express the great satisfaction of the Government at the forbearance, discretion and firmness with which you have acted, amid the perplexing and difficult circumstances in which you have been placed. You will continue, as heretofore, to act strictly on the defensive; to avoid, by all means compatible with the safety of your command, a collision with the hostile forces by which you are surrounded. But for the movement so promptly and brilliantly executed, by which you transferred your forces to Fort Sumter, the probability is that ere this the defenselessness of your position would have invited an attack, which, there is reason to believe, was contemplated, if not in active preparation, which must have led to the effusion of blood, that has been thus so happily prevented. The movement, therefore, was in every way admirable, alike for its humanity [and] patriotism, as for its soldiership.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT.

Secretary of War ad interim.

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 12, 1861

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: The sudden resolution to send a joint commission to Washington enables me to write only a few lines to tell you that my operations are going steadily on.

Page 138–

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain of Engineers.

( At this time i haven’t found anything about a commission to Washington. I assuming this is the peace commision to see Buchanan and perhaps some officers from Fort Sumter. Perhaps leter entries will tell us more.)

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FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 14, 1861

General JOS. G. TOTTEN,

Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that the facilities for mail communication between this fort and the city of Charleston have been restored by order of Governor Pickens. The arrangement is for one of my boats to receive the mail at Fort Johnson, wither it is to be brought every day at 12 o’clock, and to deliver the mail from the fort at the same time to be taken to the office in the city. The reason assigned for this particular arrangement is that it will avoid all chances for rencounters and bloodshed between our boats’ crews and riotous persons on the wharves in the city. All letters from the Department will, in all probability, be received. Page 139

During the continuance of the present arrangements for the mail I will keep you fully informed of everything that transpires.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Captain, Engineers.

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 140 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 16, 1861

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

First Artillery, Commanding Fort Sumter:

SIR: Your dispatch Numbers 17, covering your correspondence with the governor of South Carolina, has been received from the hand of Lieutenant Talbot. You rightly designate the firing into the Star of the West as “an act of war,” and one which was actually committed without the slightest provocation. Had their act been perpetrated by a foreign nation, it would have been your imperative duty to have resented it with the whole force of your batteries. As, however, it was the work of the government of South Carolina, which is a member of this confederacy, and was prompted by the passions of a highly-inflamed population of citizens of the United States, your forbearance to return the fire is fully approved by the President. Unfortunately, the Government had not been able to make known to you that the Star of the West had sailed from New York for your relief, and hence, when she made her appearance in the harbor of Charleston, you did not feel the force of the obligation to protect her approach as you would naturally have done had this information reached you. Your late dispatches, as well as the very intelligent statement of Lieutenant Talbot, have relieved the Government of the apprehensions previously entertained for your safety. In consequence it is not its purpose at present to re-enforce you. The attempt to do so would, no doubt, be attended by a collision of arms and the effusion of blood-a national calamity which the President is most anxious, if possible, to avoid. You will therefore, report frequently your condition, and the character and activity of the preparations, if any, which may be being made for an attack upon the fort, or for obstructing the Government in any endeavors it may make to strengthen your command.

Should your dispatches be of a nature too important to be intrusted to the mails you will convey them by special messengers. Whenever, in your judgment, additional supplies or re-enforcements are necessary for your safety, or for a successful defense of the fort, you will at once communicate the fact to this Department, and a prompt and vigorous effort will be made to forward them. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT,

The Star of The West Incident– Part 3

OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 135 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Headquarters, Charleston, January 9, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

Commanding Fort Sumter:

SIR: Your letter has been received. In it you make certain statements which very plainly show that you have not been fully informed by your Government of the precise relations which now exist between it and the State of South Carolina. Official information has been communicated to the Government of the United States that the political connection heretofore existing between the State of South Carolina and the States which were known as the United States had ceased, and that the State of South Carolina had resumed all the power it had delegated to the United States under the compact known as the Constitution of the United States. The right which the State of South Carolina possessed to change the political relations which it held with other States under the Constitution of the United States has been solemnly asserted by the people of this State in convention, and now does not admit of discussion. In anticipation of the ordinance of secession, of which the President of the United States has received official notification, it was understood by him that sending any re-enforcement of the troops of the United States in the harbor of Charleston would be regarded by the constituted authorities of the State of South Carolina as an act of hostility, and at the same time it was understood by him that any change in the occupation of the forts in the harbor of Charleston would in like manner be regarded as an act of hostility. Either or both of these events, occurring during the period in which the State of South Carolina constituted a part of the United States, was then distinctly notified to the President of the United States as an act or acts of hostility; because either or both would be regarded, and could only be intended, to dispute the right of the State of South Carolina to that political independence which she has always asserted and will always retain. Whatever would have been, during the continuance of this State as a member of the United States, an act of hostility, became much more so when the State of South Carolina had dissolved the connection with the Government of the United States. After the secession of the State of South Carolina, Fort Sumter continued in the possession of the troops of the United States. How that fort is at this time in the possession of the troops of the United States it is not now necessary to discuss. It will suffice to say that the occupancy of that fort has been regarded by the State of South Carolina as the first act of positive hostility committed by the troops of the United States within the limits of this State, and was in this light regarded as so unequivocal that it occasioned the termination of the negotiations then pending at Washington between the Commissioners of the State of South Carolina and the President of the United States. The attempt to re-enforce the troops now at Fort Sumter, or to retake and resume possession of the forts within the waters of this State, which you abandoned, after spiking the guns placed there, and doing otherwise much damage, cannot be regarded by the authorities of the State as indicative of any other purpose than the coercion of the State by the armed force of the Government. To repel such an attempt is too plainly its duty to allow it to be discussed. But while defending its waters, the authorities of the State have been careful so to conduct the affairs of the State that no act, however necessary for its defense, should lead to an useless waste of life. Special agents, therefore, have been off the bar to warn all approaching vessels, if armed or unarmed, and having troops to re-

136–

enforce the forts on board, not to enter the harbor of Charleston, and special orders have been given to the commanders of all forts and batteries not to fire at such vessels until a shot fired across their bows would warn them of the prohibition or the State. Under these circumstances, the Star of the West, it is understood this morning attempted to enter this harbor, with troops on board, and having been notified that she could not enter, was fired into. The act is perfectly justified by me. In regard to your threat in regard to vessels in the harbor, it is only necessary to say that you must judge of your own responsibilities. Your position in this harbor has been tolerated by the authorities of the State, and while the act of which you complain is in perfect consistency with the rights and duties of the State, it is not perceived how far the conduct which you propose to adopt can find a parallel in the history of any country, or be reconciled with any other purpose of your Government than that of imposing upon this State the condition of a conquered province.

F. W. PICKENS.

The Star of the West Incident– Part 2

OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 133 Chapter I. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. – UNION.

FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 6, 1861

Colonel S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Through the courtesy of Governor Pickens I am enabled to make this communication, which will be taken to Washington by my brother, Larz Anderson, esq. I have the honor to report my command in excellent health and in fine spirits. We are daily adding to the strength of our position by closing up embrasures which we shall not use, mounting guns, &c. The South Carolinians are also very active in erecting batteries and preparing for a conflict, which I pray God may not occur. Batteries have been constructed bearing upon and, I presume, commanding the entrance to the harbor. They are also to-day busily at work on a battery at Fort Johnson, intended to fire against me. My position will, should there be no treachery among the workmen, whom we are compelled to retain for the present enable me to hold this fort against any force which can be brought against me, and it would enable me in the event of a war, to annoy the South Carolinians by preventing them from throwing supplies into their new posts except by the out-of-the-way passage through Stone River. AT present, it would be dangerous and difficult for a vessel from without to enter the harbor, in consequence of the batteries which are already erected and being erected. I shall not ask for any increase of my command, because I do not know what the ulterior views of the Government are. We are now, or soon will be, cut off from all communication, unless by means of a powerful fleet, which shall have the ability to carry the batteries at the mouth of this harbor.

Trusting in God that nothing will occur to array a greater number of States than have already taken ground against the General Government,

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

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Page 134

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY

Washington, January 7, 1861

COMMANDING OFFICER, DETACHMENT U. S. ARMY,
On board steamship Star of the West,

Supposed to be near Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: This communication is sent through the commander of the U. S. steam sloop-of-war Brooklyn.

His mission is twofold: First, to afford aid and succor in case your ship be shattered or injured; second, to convey this order of recall for your detachment in case it cannot land at Fort Sumter, to proceed to Fort Monroe, Hampton Roads, and there await further orders.

In case of your return to Hampton Roads, send a telegraphic message here at once from Norfolk.

Yours, very respectfully,

W. SCOTT.

P. S. – On arrival at Fort Monroe, land your troops and discharge the ship.

W. SCOTT.

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Page 134

Colonel S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to send herewith the correspondence which took place to-day between the governor of South Carolina and myself in relation to the firing by his batteries on a vessel bearing our flag. Lieutenant Talbot, whose health is very much impaired, will be the bearer of these dispatches, and he will be enabled to give you full information in reference to this and to all other matters.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

[Inclosures.]

FORT SUMTER, S. C., January 9, 1861

To his Excellency the GOVERNOR OF SOUTH CAROLINA:

SIR: Two of your batteries fired this morning upon an unarmed vessel bearing the flag of my Government. As I have not been notified that war has been declared by South Carolina against the Government of the United States, I cannot but think that this hostile act was committed without your sanction or authority. Under that hope, and that alone, did I refrain from opening fire upon your batteries. I have the honor, therefore, respectfully to ask whether the above mentioned act-one, I believe, without a parallel in the history of our country or of any other civilized government-was committed in obedience to your instructions, and to notify you, if it be not disclaimed, that I must regard it as an act of war, and that I shall not, after a reasonable time for the return of my messenger, permit any vessels to pass within range of the guns of my fort. In order to save, as far as in my power, the shedding of blood, I beg that you will have due notification of this my decision given to all concerned. Hoping, however, that your answer may be such as will justify a further continuance of forbearance upon my part,

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON,

Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

The Star of the West Incident— Part 1

I had really wanted to do this in order of events, but it seems this is the best time to make this post.

The Star of Rhe west is often described as a supply mission. We can clearly see it was not.

GP

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 1, Part 1 (Charleston Campaign)

Page 130 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

NEW YORK, January 4, 1861.

Lieutenant General WINFIELD SCOTT,

Washington, D. C.:

DEAR GENERAL: I had an interview with Mr. Schultz at 8 o’clock last evening, and found him to be, as you supposed, the commission, and together we visit Mr. M. O. Roberts. The latter looks exclusively to the dollars, whilst Mr. S. is acting for the good of his country. Mr. R. required $1,500 per day for tend days, besides the cost of 300 tons of coal, which I declined; but, after a long conversation, I became satisfied that the movement could be made with his vessel, the Star of the West, without exciting suspicion. I finally chartered her at $1,250 per day. She is running on the New Orleans route, and will clear for that port; but no notice will be put in the papers, and persons seeing the ship moving from the dock will suppose she is on her regular trip. Major Eaton, commissary of subsistence fully enters intro my views. He will see Mr. Roberts, hand him a list of the supplies with the places where they may be procured, and the purchases will be made on the ship’s account. In this way no public machinery will be used.

Page 131

To-night I pass over to Governor’s Island to do what is necessary, i.e., have 300 stand of arms and ammunition on the wharf, and 200 men ready to march on board Mr. Schultz’s steam-tugs about nightfall to-morrow to go to the steamer, passing very slowly down the bay. I shall cut off all communication between the island and the cities until Tuesday morning, when I expect the steamer will be safely moored at Fort Sumter.

I have seen and conversed with Colonel Scott, and also saw your daughter at your house. After leaving you, I obtained the key of the outer door of the office, but could nowhere find the key of your door or of mine, so failed to get the chart. This is of little moment, as the captain of the steamer is perfectly familiar with the entrance of Charleston.

I telegraphed you this morning as follows:

Arrangements made as proposed; to leave to-morrow evening; send map.

I will now leave the office, where I am writing, to proceed to the island.

Very respectfully, General, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
New York, January 5, 1861.

Major T. H. HOLMES,

Eighth Infantry,

Superintendent Recruiting Service, Fort Columbus:

SIR: By direction of the General-in-Chief, you will detach this evening two hundred of the best-instructed men at Fort Columbus, by the steamship Star of the West, to re-enforce the garrison at Fort Sumter, South Carolina.
They will be furnished with arms, and, if possible, one hundred rounds of ammunition per man. Orders will be given to the proper officers of the staff department to furnish one hundred stand of spare arms and subsistence for three months.

The officers assigned to duty with the detachment are Lieuts. C. R. Woods, Ninth Infantry; W. A. Webb, Fifth Infantry; C. W. Thomas, First Infantry, and Asst. Surg. P. G. S. Ten Broeck, Medical Department, all of whom will report for duty to Major Anderson, commanding Fort Sumter.

Yours,

L. THOMAS.

HEADQUARTERS, January 5, 1861.

First Lieutenant CHARLES R. WOODS,
Ninth Infantry, Fort Columbus:

SIR: The steamship Star of the West has been chartered to take two hundred recruits from Fort Columbus to Fort Sumter, South Carolina, to re-enforce the garrison at that post. You are placed in command of the detachment, assisted by Lieuts. W. A. Webb, Fifth Infantry, C. W. Thomas, First Infantry, and Asst. Surg. P. G. S. Ten Broeck, Medical Department. Arms and ammunition for your men will be placed don the steamer and three months’ supply of subsistence.

The duty upon which you are now placed by direction of the Gen-

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eral-in-Chief will require great care and energy on your part to execute it successfully, for it is important that all your movements be kept as secret as possible. Accordingly on approaching the Charleston bar, you will place below decks your entire force, in order that only the ordinary crew may be seen by persons from the shore or on boarding the vessel. Every precaution must be resorted to prevent being fired upon by batteries erected on either Sullivan’s or James Island.

Yours,

L. THOMAS.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
New York, January 5, 1861.

Major ROBERT ANDERSON,

First Artillery, Commanding Fort Sumter:

SIR: In accordance with the instructions of the General-in-Chief, I yesterday chartered the steamship Star of the West to re-enforce your small garrison with two hundred well-instructed recruits from Fort Columbus, under First Lieutenant C. R. Woods, Ninth Infantry, assisted by Lieuts. W. A. Webb, Fifth Infantry; C. W. Thomass, First Infantry, and Asst. Surg. P. G. S Broeck, Medical Department, all of whom you will retain until further orders. Besides arms for the men, one hundred spare arms and all the cartridges in the arsenal on Governor’s Island will be sent; likewise, three months’ subsistence for the detachment and six months’ desiccated and fresh vegetables, with three or four days’ fresh beef for your entire force. Further re-enforcements will be sent if necessary.

Should a fire, likely to prove injurious, be opened upon any vessel bringing re-enforcements or supplies, or upon tow-boats within the reach of your guns, they may be employed to silence such fire; and you may act in like manner in case a fire is opened upon Fort Sumter itself.

The General-in-Chief desires me to communicate the fact that your conduct meets which the emphatic approbation of the highest in authority.

You are warned to be upon your guard against all telegrams, as false ones may be attempted to be passed upon you. Measures will soon be taken to enable you to correspond with the Government by sea and Wilmington, N. C.

You will send to Fort Columbus by the return of the steamer all your sick, otherwise inefficient, officers and enlisted men. Fill up the two companies with the recruits now sent, and muster the residue as a detachment.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No Shame what-so-ever

Props to Jessie Sanford for this gem.

http://cwmemory.com/2014/08/12/rip-robin-williams/#comment-89152

The Confederate Flag is just a symbol of states rights… Yeah, and the Swastika is just a Tibetan good luck charm, c’mon now.”

Robin Williams, Live on Broadway (2002)

by Jessie Alan Sanford August 12, 2014 Kevin really? You are going to use a man’s sad passing as a way to further your anti-Southern agenda. Sir you are one sick puppy

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by Kevin Levin August 13, 2014 Yes, my anti-Southern agenda knows no bounds. This comment has to go into the hall of fame for nuttiest.

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We all know Robin Williams made his living by telling jokes. Notice he is playing onBroadway, he may just be playing to the crowd. Maybe not. I suspect Williams is not into true history.

This is more proof that Levins blog is just a trashy joke.

Jefferson Davis on Why the South Fought

Richmond Examiner editorial

August 02, 1864

Mr. Davis, in conversation with a Yankee spy, named Edward Kirk, is reported by said spy to have said, “We are not fighting for slavery; we are fighting for independence.” This is true; and is a truth that has not sufficiently been dwelt upon. It would have been very much to be desired that this functionary had developed the idea in some message, or some other State paper… instead of leaving it to be promulgated through the doubtful report of an impudent blockade-runner.… The sentiment is true, and should be publicly uttered and kept conspicuously in view; because our enemies have diligently labored to make all mankind believe that the people of these States have set up a pretended State sovereignty, and based themselves upon that ostensibly, while their real object has been only to preserve to themselves the property in so many negroes, worth so many millions of dollars. The direct reverse is the truth. The question of slavery is only one of the minor issues; and the cause of the war, the whole cause, on our part, is the maintenance of the sovereign independence of these States.…

The whole cause of our resistance was and is, the pretension and full determination of the Northern States to use their preponderance in the Federal representation, in order to govern the Southern States for their profit. . Slavery was the immediate occasion–carefully made so by them–it was not the cause. The tariff… would have much more accurately represented, though it did not cover, or exhaust, the real cause of the quarrel. Yet neither tariffs nor slavery, nor both together, could ever have been truly called the cause of the secession and the war. We refuse to accept for a cause any thing… than that truly announced, namely, the sovereign independence of our States. This, indeed, includes both those minor questions, as well as many others yet graver and higher. It includes full power to regulate our trade for our own profit, and also complete jurisdiction over our own social and domestic institutions; but it further involves all the nobler attributes of national, and even of individual life and character. A community which once submits to be schooled, dictated to, legislated for, by any other, soon grows poor in spirit;… its citizens, become a kind of half-men, [and] feel that they have hardly a right to walk in the sun.…

The people of Virginia do not choose to accept that position for themselves and for their children. They choose rather to die. They own a noble country, which their fathers created, exalted, and transmitted to them.… That inheritance we intend to own while we live, and leave intact to those who are to come after us.…

It is right to let foreign nations, and “those whom it may concern,” understand this theory of our independence. Let them understand that, though we are “not fighting for slavery,” we will not allow ourselves to be dictated to in regard to slavery or any other of our internal affairs, not because thatwould diminish our interest in any property, but because it touches our independence.