Why Did the Northern States Fight? Part 3

Joint Resolutions of the Legislature of the State of Minnesota, on the state of the Union. Adopted January 22, 1861.
1. Resolved, That one of the vital and necessary principles which form the basis of all free governments, is that the constitutional majority must always rule. And therefore, the right of the people of any State to withdraw from the Union, thereby hazarding the liberties and happiness of the millions comprising this Confederacy, can never be acknowledged by us under any circumstances.
We regard secession upon the part of any State as amounting directly to revolution, and precipitating civil war with all its sad train of consequences.
2. Resolved, That the people of the State of Minnesota re-iterate their unalterable devotion to the Constitution of the United States, and that if its provisions are strictly observed, it will, in its own words, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.
3. Resolved, That ABRAHAM LINCOLN and HANNIBAL HAMLIN, having been constitutionally and legally elected President and Vice President of the United States, at a general election fully and freely participated in, on the same day, by the people of every State of the Union, South as well as North, that any attempt to dissolve or destroy the Union on account thereof, is without excuse or justification, and should receive the condemnation of every patriot in the land.
4. Resolved, That we have heard with astonishment and indignation of the recent outrages perpetrated at Charleston, South Carolina, by firing upon an American steamer, sailing under the flag of our country, and that we expect of the General Government the strongest and most vigorous effort to assert its supremacy, and to check the work of rebellion and treason. Fully impressed with our duty to make every possible effort to uphold the Union, and to maintain the authority of the General Government, we hereby tender to the President of the United States, for that purpose, through the Governor of this State, aid in men and money, to the extent of our ability.
When one or more States erect the standard of disunion, and place themselves in military array against the Government bequeathed to us by our ancestors, we can discover no other honorable or patriotic resource than to test, both on land and on ocean, the full strength of the Federal authority under our National Flag.
5. Resolved, That we declare to each State of this Union our sincere desire to secure a renewal of that fraternal feeling which ought always to exist between citizens of a common country, and which distinguished the history of the nation for more than half a century. Especially do we express to those patriotic citizens of the Southern States, who have nobly and manfully exerted their utmost effort to prevent the catastrophe of dissolution, our sincere gratitude and highest admiration.
6. Resolved, That the most sincere thanks of the nation are justly due to that distinguished patriot and veteran, Lt. General Winfield Scott for the prompt and decisive steps he has taken to stay the tide of revolution, and for the determined spirit he has evinced in maintaining the honor of our Government.
7. Resolved, That we never will consent or submit to the obstruction of the free navigation of the Mississippi river, from its source to its mouth, by any power hostile to the Federal Government.
8. Resolved, That the Governor of this State is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the President of the United States, to Lt. General Winfield Scott, and to each of our Senators and Representatives in the Congress of the United States, and to the Governors of the several States.
IGNATIUS DONNELLY,
President of the Senate.
JARED BENSON,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
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California:

passed at the

Twelfth Session of the Legislature
1861

Begun Monday the Seventh Day of January, and ended on Monday the Twelfth Day of May.

Page 686

No. XVIII. Concurrent Resolution
(Adopted May 17, 1861)
Resolved, By the Senate, the Assembly concurring that the people of California are devoted to the Constitution and Union of the United States , and will not fail in fidelity and fealty to that Constitution and Union, now in hour of trial and peril. That california is ready to maintain the rights and honor of the national Government at home and abroad, and at all times to respond to any requisition that may be made upon her to defend the Republic against foreign and domestic foes.
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Connecticut

A Proclamation
By his Excellency the Governor

Eleven States of the Union are now armed and in open rebellion against federal authority; they have paralyzed the business of the nation, have involved us in civil war, and are now exerting their combined energies to rob us of the blessing of a free government. The greatness of their crime has no parallel in the history of human governments. At this critical juncture, our liberties are still further imperilled by the utterance of seditious language; by a traitorous press, which excuses or justifies the rebellion; by secret organizations, which propose to resist the laws of this State by force; by public exhibition of “peace flags’ falsely so called; and by an effort to redress regardless of the forms and officers of the law.
The very exsistence of our government, the future prosperity of this entire nation, and the hopes of universal demand that these outrages be suppressed.
The constitution guarantees liberty of speech and the press, but holds the person and the press responsible for the evils which result for the evils which result from this liberty. It guarantees the protection of property, but it regards as sacred which is used to subvert governmental authority, it guarantees the person from unreasonable seizure, but it protects no individual from arrest and punishment who gives aid and confort to the enemies of our country. It provides by law for the punishment of offences, but allows no grievance to be redressed by violence.
I therefore call upon the citizens of this state to support and uphold the authority and dignity of this government, and to abstain from any act which can tend to encourage and strengthen this conspiracy; and I call upon the officers of the law to be active, diligent and fearless in arresting and instituting legal proceedings for the punishment of those who disturb the public peace, of those guilty of sedition and treason, and those who are embraced in combinations to obstruct the execution of the
laws; so that peace may be again restored to our distracted country, and the liberties of the people be preserved.
Given under my hand, and the seal of this state at Hartford, this thirty-first day of August, A.D. 1861
Wm. A. Buckingham
By his excellency’s command.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A Proclamation
By his Excellency the Governor

Eleven States of the Union are now armed and in open rebellion against federal authority; they have paralyzed the business of the nation, have involved us in civil war, and are now exerting their combined energies to rob us of the blessing of a free government. The greatness of their crime has no parallel in the history of human governments. At this critical juncture, our liberties are still further imperilled by the utterance of seditious language; by a traitorous press, which excuses or justifies the rebellion; by secret organizations, which propose to resist the laws of this State by force; by public exhibition of “peace flags’ falsely so called; and by an effort to redress regardless of the forms and officers of the law.
The very existence of our government, the future prosperity of this entire nation, and the hopes of universal demand that these outrages be suppressed.
The constitution guarantees liberty of speech and the press, but holds the person and the press responsible for the evils which result for the evils which result from this liberty. It guarantees the protection of property, but it regards as sacred which is used to subvert governmental authority, it guarantees the person from unreasonable seizure, but it protects no individual from arrest and punishment who gives aid and confort to the enemies of our country. It provides by law for the punishment of offences, but allows no grievance to be redressed by violence.
I therefore call upon the citizens of this state to support and uphold the authority and dignity of this government, and to abstain from any act which can tend to encourage and strengthen this conspiracy; and I call upon the officers of the law to be active, diligent and fearless in arresting and instituting legal proceedings for the punishment of those who disturb the public peace, of those guilty of sedition and treason, and those who are embraced in combinations to obstruct the execution of the
laws; so that peace may be again restored to our distracted country, and the liberties of the people be preserved.

Given under my hand, and the seal of this state at Hartford, this thirty-first day of August, A.D. 1861

Wm. A. Buckingham
By his excellency’s command.

Source: Connecticut State Library, Ms jenny Groome assisting
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Michigan

No. 12

JOINT RESOLUTION in reference to the rebellion

Wheras, The Government of the United States is engaged in putting down a causeless and wicked rebellion against its authority and sovereignty, inaugurated by ambitious men to obtain political power – a Government, the safety and perpetuity of which must ever rest upon the loyalty of its citizens and adherence to the Constitution;

And whereas, The Welfare of mankind, the usefulness and power of the nation, are involved in the events and issues of the present conflict; therefore, be it

Resolved, (the House concurring) That Michigan, loyal to herself and to the Federal Government, reaffirms her undying hostility to traitors, her abiding love for freedom, and her confidence in the wisdom and patriotism of the national administration.

Resolved, (the House concurring) That the people of Michigan deem it imperative duty of the Government to speedily put down all insurrection against its authority and sovereignty, by the use of every constitutional means and by the employment of every energy it possesses; that Michigan stands firm in her determination to sustain by men and treasure, the Constitution and the Union, and claims that the burthen of loyal man should be lightened, as far as possible, by confiscating, to the largest extent, the property of all insurrectionists; and that as between the institution of slavery and the Federal Government Michigan does not hesitate to say, that in such exigency, slavery, should be swept from the land, and our country maintained.

Resolved that the Governor be requested to forward a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolution to each of our Senators and representatives in Congress.

Approved January 18, 1862
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Resolution of thanks to his excellency Wm. Sprague

Resolved that the action of his excellency the governor in tendering to the president of the United States the service of our ? And infantry and a battalion of artillery for the protection of the national capital and his subsequent proceedings to carry out to the fullest intent the necessary means for rendering this service efficient with the most cordial approval of this assembly and the thanks of this General Assembly be and they are hereby tendered to His Excellency for his prompt and efficient actions.

April 17th 1861
read and passed
by order —————-
Sec of State

In the house of Representatives
April 17th 1861
Read and concurred with an amendment by —– the word “legislature” and inserting therefore the words general assembly.
By order
Thomas L. Anthony, Clerk

April 17, 1861
Read and Concured the amendment

Mr. Purvis,
Aside from a General Assembly resolution of thanks dated April 17th, 1861 to Governor William Sprague for his actions in tendering to the President of the US the services of RI troops to defend the capital no issues relative to support for the Union were identify among the proceedings of the legislature or extant proclamations issued by the governor. Provided attachment is a copy of that resolution.

Ken Carlson

Reference Archivist

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There you have it folks. The war resolutions of each Northern state that drew up one. Note that none of these states sent troops to fight to free the slaves proving such statements are nothing but a myth. Michigan goes further than anyone calling for slavery to be wiped from the land. At the same time this resolution tramples on the property rights of slave owners and almost gives the United States government absolute power to do as it pleases!!!!!!!!!

Another note some of these are transcribed from photo copies of original documents. Any spelling  and grammar errors are as I read them  

 

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