The Cotton Was in the South, the Action Was in the North:

The Cotton Was in the South, the Action Was in the North:
 
“The explosion of raw material from the South that followed [Eli Whitney’s invention] soon enriched New England’s textile aristocracy whose mills were partially responsible for driving up the number of slaves fivefold between 1800 and 1860. In that year close to four million slaves accounted for nearly 40 percent of the South’s population. Seeking new arable cotton acreage, Southern growers by then had relentlessly expanded westward into virgin territories that would become Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Missouri.
 
In the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812, England and the United States agreed to suppress the slave trade. So much for policy positions. In reality, Baltimore builders designed faster clipper ships to carry and deliver cargoes of slaves for Liverpool’s thriving slave traders. Slave-produced cotton created many of England’s most prestigious banks, including the giants Barclay and Lloyds. Liverpool’s towering skyline of massive Victorian commercial buildings stands as a monument to [slave-produced] cotton supremacy.
 
[New England] cotton mills were well on their way to producing $115,000,000 worth of cotton by 1860, or three times as much as the country imported, and every ounce of it relied wholly on slave labor. A US Census in 1790 counted nearly 697,124 slaves, with almost as many in New York (21,234) as in Georgia (29,264). Despite the Constitutional ban on further importation in 1808, by 1820 there were 1,533,086 slaves, almost all now in the South, and Virginia alone accounted for 425,757.  By then the South produced an astonishing 2.275 billion pounds of raw cotton, and the crop accounted for 60 percent of the country’s exports. The South now supplied over 80 percent of the cotton manufactured in Britain, two-thirds of the world’s total supply, and all the cotton used in New England’s mills. 
 
Cotton was New York’s leading export; the South depended on New York as well as for European home furnishings and high-quality imported fabrics including silks and linens. The irony in all this was that although a New York stopover required ships to travel 200 miles out of their direct lane between Liverpool and Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans, there was no logistical reason for its involvement. “The combined income from interest, commissions, freight, insurance, and other profits were so great that, when Southerners finally awoke to what was happening, they claimed that New Yorkers with a few other Northerners were getting forty cents for every dollar paid for Southern cotton,” one historian reported. Southern States that had fought to win their independence from the British crown now relinquished it economically to the North. 
 
New York did more than ship Southern cotton; it provided much of the funding for it. Hundreds of Yankee cotton factors from New York blanketed the South every year, working with Manhattan banking houses that had the capital to make loans. Acting as independent intermediaries, the factors advanced long credit at high interest against next year’s crop, usually from 7 to 12 percent, and took their cut. Southern banks played a minor role. [Planter] Debt was chronic. 
 
It resulted primarily from the growers’ need to expand their acreage and buy more slaves. That in turn gave financiers from England and New York the power to monitor their operations, squeeze out higher interest rates…bales became payment; they quickly turned into cash as New Yorkers sold that raw cotton to Liverpool to supply Lancashire’s mills. The cotton fields were in the South, but the action was in the North for speculators and businessmen.”
 
(Cotton, Stephen Yafa, Penguin Books, 2005, excerpts pp. 121-136)

More Al Mackey spin

http://studycivilwar.wordpress.com/2013/12/23/why-did-mississippi-secede/#comments

Mackey is now going through the secession  docs cherry picking various quotes and passages from the docs to make his hate filled bigoted  agenda.  Of course he gets his usual bigots to join in agreement. Most of them haven’t the good sense to look up the documents themselves and one hater openly admits this to be true.  I suggest everyone read these documents without prejudice and note the items not associated  each item for what it really is.http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/reasons.html#Mississippi

For instance lets take this passage —-It seeks not to elevate or to support the slave, but to destroy his present condition without providing a better.

Mackey’s spin is “As if freedom wasn’t an elevation of their status.” That is a statement a bigot or a fool would make. Take for instance all slaves were freed over night  Where would they go?How would they feed themselves and their children?Where would they find shelter. I got an idea, why not read a couple of my pages back and see what happens when slaves ARE Freed in mass and come under the protection of the Union army? —–

A real massacre of Unarmed civilians —- https://coldsouthernsteel.wordpress.com/2013/12/18/a-real-massacre-of-unarmed-civilians/

The bottom line is regardless of the reason Mississippi, Georgia, Texas, or South Carolina decided to leave the Union, it was their right. Period. It could have been because of the smell of Lincoln if they had wanted to go that route.

 

A real massacre of Unarmed civilians

In reference  to the Fort Pillow “massacre.” Comments from http://studycivilwar.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/fort-pillow-and-nathan-bedford-forrest-part-3-whose-fault/#respond

So this particular massacre, and the involvement of race as the significant factor, is a product of a war caused by chattel slavery.

Yes, and as I said in the post the institution of slavery itself, and what it led people to do and to think, played a significant role.

In his own words Al Mackey declares the Fort Pillow battle a result of the institution of slavery. Ok, so that is his opinion and he is entitled to that no matter how far-fetched it is.

Now if the Hate not History guru will be so kind, perhaps he can give us his opinion on this incident in Louisiana committed by Union troops under Gen. Banks. I would love an answer, it is always interesting to see how a neo- yankee will try to spin history.

***********************************

Official Report Relative to The Conduct of Federal Troops in Western Louisiana during the Invasion of 1863 and 1864.

Compiled from testimony under the direction of
Governor Henry W. Allen

Page 10 —

— Though we cannot reproduce his graphic description of what he witnessed in his own words, we take the liberty of giving enough of it, from memory to convey an idea of this licentious march. “The road,” said he, ‘”Was filled with an indiscriminate mass of armed men, on horseback and on foot, carts, wagons, cannon and caisson, rolling along in most tumultuous disorder, while to the right and to the left, joining the mass, and detaching from it, singly and in groups, were hundreds going empty-handed and returning laden Disregarding the lanes and pathways, they broke through fields and enclosures, spreading in every direction that promised plunder or attracted curiosity. Country carts, horses, mules and oxen, followed by Negro men, women, and even children, (who were pressed into service to carry the plunder,) laden with every conceivable object, were approaching and mingling in the mass from every side.

Page 52–
(Speaking of slaves) —– Of the tide of human beings we have described, two thousand perished in six weeks. Their shallow graves lie along the waters of the Ramos. Scooped out with careless indifference, and covered with indecent haste, they were only marked by swarms of fattened flies, living on the putrid matter oozing through the loose earth above them. They have found their freedom; such freedom as God vouchsafes to all the children of men.

Page 53 —
Many, following the army, were present, and crossed with it; and thus had an opportunity to witness the actual condition of the slaves, the moment they passed from the Federal hands.

Seven miles from the town Brashear, on the bank« of the Bayou Ramos, they found, have described, the graves of the dead; the condition of the living, as they found them, we will attempt to describe. Skirting the bayou, in a thicket of undergrowth and briars, were encamped, without shelter, a wretched, death-stricken crowd of human beings, who but a few short weeks before, had been driven from their homes full of the rigor of health, and overflowing with the exuberance of animal life, and now were dying in squalid filth, or living in abject misery. The adjacent thicket, filled with the decomposing bodies of those, who, dragging themselves thither, and falling from exhaustion, had, unable to return, died there; spread over the camps a nauseous stench, which threatened death to the survivors. Crouched to the earth, with their heads sunk between their knees, or lying with upturned faces, gazing vacantly in the air, the poor surviving negroes were moved by no sympathies for the sufferers around them. Sunk in despondency and despair, or oppressed by deadly stupor, they not only neglected the last duties to the dead, but they regarded with stupid indifference those who were falling into the jaws of death. Many were

Page 54—- It was afterwards remarked, that even hard men, who found their slaves on neighboring plantations, softened by so many exhibitions of destitution, suffering and death, met them with the feelings of a father, and welcomed the return of the prodigal son.

— Every eye turned instinctively to the sugar house, standing nearby, as if to penetrate its mysteries.

Dr. George Hill, a distinguished physician and surgeon of Opelousas, whose nerves had been fortified by an active professional practice for forty years, has, under the solemnity of an oath, furnished us with a statement of what he witnessed. We copy the essential portions of his communication: “In the summer of 1863, Berwick’s Bay and a portion of the Lafourche country were taken possession of by the Confederate army. I, with many others, who had lost their property by the raid which the Federal army had made, between the 20th of April and the 20th of May, of this year, visited the Bay for the purpose of recovering our property. I was among the first who crossed the Bay; and having been informed, on the night of my arrival, by a gentleman of the name of March, that I had lost several negroes at the sugar house of Dr. Saunders, and that others were there in a dying condition, in the morning, as soon as a horse could be obtained, I proceeded to the sugar house of Dr. S., and entered it by a door in the west end. The scene which then and there presented itself, can never be effaced from my memory. On the right hand side of the Purgery floor, from where I stood, lay three female corpses in a state of nudity, and also in a far advanced stage of decomposition. Many others were lying all over the floor; many speechless and in a dying condition. All appeared to have died of the same disease—bloody flux. The floor was slippery with blood, mucus and feces. The dying, and all those unable to help themselves, were lying with their scanty garments rolled around their heads and breasts— the lower part of the body

Page 54 — naked—and every time« an involuntary discharge of blood and feces, combined with air, would pass, making a slight noise, clouds of flies, such as I never saw before, would immediately rise and settle down again on all the exposed parts of the dying. * * In passing through the house, a cold chill shook my frame, from which I did not recover for several. months, and, indeed, it came near causing my life.

Page 55 —

As I passed from the house I met with a negro man of my own, who informed me that he had lost his wife and two children. 1 asked him if his friends, the Yankees, had not furnished him with medicine. He said “no, and if they had, I would not have given it to my family, as all who took their medicine died in twelve hours from the time of its being given” (Poisoned medicine being given to children!!!)

This deposition having been read to Dr. Saunders, the proprietor of the sugar house in question, and now a representative of St. Mary in the State Senate, ho declared, that while it was faithful in the general description, it did not exhibit all the horrors of the scone; as before the arrival of Dr. Hill, he had caused many decomposed bodies that filled the coolers to be removed and. interred. A hundred others would, if necessary, add their testimony to that of these gentlemen.

There were other places on the island where the poor wretches were bivouacked, all presenting the same scenes of squalid misery. On the representation of the gentlemen who witnessed them, the Confederate officer in charge of the posit, moved by a manly sympathy, immediately put in requisition his military transports, then pressingly needed for the military service, and had all the poor creatures removed, under proper medical superintendence, to a more salubrious place on the Teche, where they could receive proper attention, with pure water and wholesome food. Had not this been promptly done, it is the opinion of the medical men present, that every soul, amounting to many hundreds, would have perished.

One of your Commissioners found two children under ten years of age separated from their parents. He subsequently learned, that while the father had been taken for the army, the mother had been thrown upon a plantation below the city of New Orleans. He found a mother with two children, who had been separated from one, a little girl aged eleven ; and he subsequently learned that she was living with a free mulatto family opposite that city. He ascertained, beyond doubt, that all the aged, all the infants, and many of the smaller children taken from his plantation had perished.

JOEN G. PRATT,
JOHN E. KING,
Special Commissioners.
 
This and more Posted on-line at Southern Heritage Advancement Preservation and Education’s website “Yankee Atrocities” at  http://confederatepows.southernheritageadvancementpreservationeducation.com/page.php?6
**************************************************************************
 
This incident clearly shows that over 2,000 unarmed Negroes,
more than the number of ARMED Negroes, who died as a result of battle in the entire war, died at the hands of the Union army because of nothing more than greed and racism.
 
Spin this Al Mackey.

Another Al Mackey version of history –Fort Pillow

Al Mackey is back at it again spinning history and telling lies.This tuime it is about Gen. N. B. Forrest at Fort Pillow. Of course, true to form,  Mackey presents a good case digging up everything he can find to convict the Confederates of a huge massacre of Black troops. I could spent a lot of time finding counter arguments and facts to present that would show the Confederate side of that issue. The question is why should I? We know the outcome of the trail conducted by Gen W.T. Sherman FORREST and The Confederate were all found NOT GUILTY!!!!

http://studycivilwar.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/fort-pillow-and-nathan-bedford-forrest-part-3-whose-fault/#respond

So it seems that the fault for the massacre can’t be assigned to one particular person, but rather to a combination of things, including confederate policy, the effect of the culture of a slave society on its inhabitants, Forrest’s habit of threatening no quarter, rage on the part of Forrest’s men left over from their reversal at Paducah, and perhaps even Forrest himself.  Certainly as the commander of the soldiers who perpetrated the massacre, Forrest bears a command responsibility, even though we have no definitive evidence of his ordering or desiring the massacre.

Reading the comments Mr. Rob Baker asks Mackey if this so-called massacre was a product of a long drawn out war and Mackey’s final answer is it was a result of slavery.Well gee Mackey first of all SHERMAN and his court found there was no massacre, much less having anything to do with slavery. So how do you determine otherwise?

Could the reason so many Negroes got killed is because they were wearing the wrong color of Uniform? Could it be because they turned tail and ran or maybe the gunboats that came up to help them killed a few?

I notice Mackey mentions the Crater and a few other battles. At the crater as well as at Fort Wagner the Union led negroes just got a butt whipping. Plain and simple.

A real massacre is what happened at Marianna, Fl. Which I have already posted

If you want a story about an atrocity committed against Negroes, before the week is out I will post a real true story just for you.

DHS employee behind website promoting race war on paid leave

 

 

So much for the Confederate Battleflag being a symbol of racism. This happened under the UNITED STYATES FLAG the true symbol of racism.

*******************http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/08/24/dhs-employee-behind-website-promoting-race-war-on-paid-leave/

The Department of Homeland Security said Friday that an employee who runs a racist website predicting and advocating a race war has been put on paid administrative leave.

 

Ayo Kimathi, an acquisitions officer for Immigration and Customs Enforcement who is in charge of buying weapons and ammunition for the government, operates the website named “War on the Horizon.” It includes descriptions of an “unavoidable, inevitable clash with the white race.” Kimathi is black.

Kimathi, who calls himself the “Irritated Genie,” told his supervisors that the website was set up to sell concert and lecture videos.

Kimathi has been with the department since 2009. His website criticizes whites, gays, those of mixed race, and blacks who integrate with whites. The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups, earlier this week reported on Kimathi’s role in running the site.

The report showed the site’s content strayed far beyond concert promotion, warning about a coming race war. The website declares, “in order for Black people to survive the 21st century, we are going to have to kill a lot of whites – more than our Christian hearts can possibly count,” the Alabama-based SPLC said in its report.

One of Kimathi’s former supervisors at DHS told SPLC’s Hatewatch that, “Everybody is the office is afraid of him,” and that his co-workers are “afraid he will come in with a gun and someday go postal.”

The supervisor, who was not named, continued, “I am astounded he’s employed by the federal government, let alone Homeland Security.”

Kimathi reportedly got the go-ahead from the government to create and maintain his website. That’s because as a law enforcement agency employee, he is required to get permission in writing if he engages in outside activities which includes everything from working a second job to volunteering.

The SPLC says Kimathi obtained official permission but did it by misrepresenting the true nature of his site.

“He told management that it was an entertainment website selling videos of concerts and lectures,” the report said. “He called it simply WOH, never saying that WOH stood for War on the Horizon.”

ICE spokeswoman Gillian Christensen said in a written statement this week that the agency “does not condone any type of hateful rhetoric or advocacy of violence of any kind against anyone.”

Kimathi hasn’t responded to email and phone calls requesting comment.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

The Cotton Was in the South, the Action Was in the North:

The Cotton Was in the South, the Action Was in the North:
 
“The explosion of raw material from the South that followed [Eli Whitney’s invention] soon enriched New England’s textile aristocracy whose mills were partially responsible for driving up the number of slaves fivefold between 1800 and 1860. In that year close to four million slaves accounted for nearly 40 percent of the South’s population. Seeking new arable cotton acreage, Southern growers by then had relentlessly expanded westward into virgin territories that would become Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Missouri.
 
In the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812, England and the United States agreed to suppress the slave trade. So much for policy positions. In reality, Baltimore builders designed faster clipper ships to carry and deliver cargoes of slaves for Liverpool’s thriving slave traders. Slave-produced cotton created many of England’s most prestigious banks, including the giants Barclay and Lloyds. Liverpool’s towering skyline of massive Victorian commercial buildings stands as a monument to [slave-produced] cotton supremacy.
 
[New England] cotton mills were well on their way to producing $115,000,000 worth of cotton by 1860, or three times as much as the country imported, and every ounce of it relied wholly on slave labor. A US Census in 1790 counted nearly 697,124 slaves, with almost as many in New York (21,234) as in Georgia (29,264). Despite the Constitutional ban on further importation in 1808, by 1820 there were 1,533,086 slaves, almost all now in the South, and Virginia alone accounted for 425,757.  By then the South produced an astonishing 2.275 billion pounds of raw cotton, and the crop accounted for 60 percent of the country’s exports. The South now supplied over 80 percent of the cotton manufactured in Britain, two-thirds of the world’s total supply, and all the cotton used in New England’s mills. 
 
Cotton was New York’s leading export; the South depended on New York as well as for European home furnishings and high-quality imported fabrics including silks and linens. The irony in all this was that although a New York stopover required ships to travel 200 miles out of their direct lane between Liverpool and Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans, there was no logistical reason for its involvement. “The combined income from interest, commissions, freight, insurance, and other profits were so great that, when Southerners finally awoke to what was happening, they claimed that New Yorkers with a few other Northerners were getting forty cents for every dollar paid for Southern cotton,” one historian reported. Southern States that had fought to win their independence from the British crown now relinquished it economically to the North. 
 
New York did more than ship Southern cotton; it provided much of the funding for it. Hundreds of Yankee cotton factors from New York blanketed the South every year, working with Manhattan banking houses that had the capital to make loans. Acting as independent intermediaries, the factors advanced long credit at high interest against next year’s crop, usually from 7 to 12 percent, and took their cut. Southern banks played a minor role. [Planter] Debt was chronic. 
 
It resulted primarily from the growers’ need to expand their acreage and buy more slaves. That in turn gave financiers from England and New York the power to monitor their operations, squeeze out higher interest rates…bales became payment; they quickly turned into cash as New Yorkers sold that raw cotton to Liverpool to supply Lancashire’s mills. The cotton fields were in the South, but the action was in the North for speculators and businessmen.”
 
(Cotton, Stephen Yafa, Penguin Books, 2005, excerpts pp. 121-136)